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Clinton/Obama/Illuminati “Planned Destruction of America”…Say IMPORTED DRUG CARTELS

GRAPHIC TRUTH IN WORD AND PICTURE AS APPROVED BY HILLARY CLINTON AND THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES!

And of course…we as “sheep” are fully unaware of this EVIL as it seeps over the border and or already is in place here no matter WHERE YOU ARE! IMPORTED DEATH! Happening now to women, children, families but NOT reported except on Newnation.org where news stories are NOT censored.

So bringing in METH…murdering raping etc…is A-OK with OBAMA and CLINTON huh? Guess so because the truth is they are AGENTS OF SATAN and Anti-Christ son and daughter PERDITION tag team with their supporters who will fill the PIT called the LAKE OF FIRE AND BRIMSTONE!

May Jesus implement his CLEANSING ACTION “Yesterday” is my prayer!

Thrown from bridges, horrifically mutilated, raped or simply ‘disappeared’: Inside the Mexican state where 900 women have either vanished or been murdered and 1,200 raped in a single year

  • WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT 
  • Guerrero state – in which the resort of Acapulco sits – is the most dangerous place for women in North America
  • 600 went missing in southern state this year, 1,249 rapes reported last year
  • Six women are murdered in Mexico every day, female defence groups claim
  • MailOnline spoke to a girl whose mother, brother and father were murdered

When her mother’s body was found decapitated on her town’s main street, Ahilin Quiñones became another one of the countless orphans in Mexico’s Guerrero state, whose lives have been destroyed by a surge in female kidnap and murder.

Her mother, Aidé Nava, was a mayoral candidate in their cartel-infested Mexican mountain village of Ahuacuotzingo.

After vowing to rid the town of its opium-cultivating gangsters, she was kidnapped by the cartel who tortured, raped and decapitated her.

On March 11, the ruthless gangsters left her body out in the open and covered it in a spray-painted sheet which read: ‘This will happen to anyone who doesn’t get in line.’

‘The police told us they couldn’t identify the body without the head,’ Ahilin told MailOnline, ‘I was forced to recognise my mother’s corpse by a birthmark she had on her forearm.’

Special day: Ahilin Quiñones (left) is one of the thousands of women in Mexico who had her life and family ripped apart by cartels who kidnapped, tortured and killed her mother Aide Nava (right)

Special day: Ahilin Quiñones (left) is one of the thousands of women in Mexico who had her life and family ripped apart by cartels who kidnapped, tortured and killed her mother Aide Nava (right)

Atrocity: The decapitated body of Ahilin's mother, Aidé Nava, was found underneath a white sheet which read: 'This will happen to anyone who doesn't get in line'

Atrocity: The decapitated body of Ahilin’s mother, Aidé Nava, was found underneath a white sheet which read: ‘This will happen to anyone who doesn’t get in line’

Marked: After her father - the town mayor - mother and brother were murdered by cartel members, locals in Iguala believe Ahilin Quiñones (pictured) and her sister Vanessa are the gangs' next targets

Marked: After her father – the town mayor – mother and brother were murdered by cartel members, locals in Iguala believe Ahilin Quiñones (pictured) and her sister Vanessa are the gangs’ next targets

Taken away: A distraught Ahilin follows her mother's coffin - adorned with bright flowers - on her funeral

Taken away: A distraught Ahilin follows her mother’s coffin – adorned with bright flowers – on her funeral

Cut down: Forensic teams in Acapulco, Mexico, cover up the body of a woman who was shot dead while selling coffee on a street corner

Cut down: Forensic teams in Acapulco, Mexico, cover up the body of a woman who was shot dead while selling coffee on a street corner

Fearless: Former mayor Maria Santos Gorrostieta, who was murdered in 2012, shows the gunshot wound from an assassination attempt

Fearless: Former mayor Maria Santos Gorrostieta, who was murdered in 2012, shows the gunshot wound from an assassination attempt

Vanished: Lupita Perez Montes (pictured), 17, who was last seen on January 31, is just one of the thousands of girls who go missing in Mexico every year

Vanished: Lupita Perez Montes (pictured), 17, who was last seen on January 31, is just one of the thousands of girls who go missing in Mexico every year

Ahilin, 19, has lost everything to the gangsters who terrorise her home town of Iguala.

Her father, town mayor Fransisco Quiñones, was murdered at gunpoint nine months earlier. Her elder brother was ‘disappeared’ by the gangsters in 2012.

Locals say Ahilin and her sister Vanessa could be the cartel’s next targets.

‘Women go missing every day from this region,’ Ahilin said, cradling her six-month-old daughter, whom she hopes to spare from a life of perpetual terror by moving to the United States, ‘My mother is just one among thousands.’

Six women are murdered in Mexico every single day, according to the National Citizen Femicide Observatory, which claims only a quarter of the 3,892 murders it reported in 2013 were actually investigated.

And the southern Guerrero state, where Acapulco is a popular holiday resort, is the most dangerous place for women in North America.

Forty-three protesting students were disappeared at the hands of the local police in Iguala last year. The audacity of the kidnapping made headlines around the world and still does. But there are many more cases that receive little or no attention.

An average of 14 women per 100,000 are murdered annually in Guerrero – four times the national average.

The most recent official statistics saw an astonishing 343 per cent increase in femicide on the previous three years, with more than 500 mothers, sisters and daughters being murdered annually.

Epidemic: Guerrero state daily newspaper, Vértice, regularly publishes graphic photographs of the previous day's murders (pictured) on its back page

Epidemic: Guerrero state daily newspaper, Vértice, regularly publishes graphic photographs of the previous day’s murders (pictured) on its back page

Terror: The southern Guerrero state, where Acapulco is a popular holiday resort, is the most dangerous place for women in North America

Terror: The southern Guerrero state, where Acapulco is a popular holiday resort, is the most dangerous place for women in North America

Female defence organisations say that this year’s statistics are already exceeding previous averages

‘The murderers aren’t even trying to hide their crimes anymore,’ said Maria Luisa Garfias, the last remaining founder of Women Allied for Justice, a pressure group that represents murdered and disappeared women.

‘The criminals enjoy total impunity,’ she told MailOnline from her office in Guerrero state capital Chilpancingo, where she has death threats are often plastered to the windows.’

Garfias’ organisation estimates that more than 600 women in Guerrero have disappeared so far this year and 1,249 rapes were reported in 2014, though the true figure could be much higher.

GANGSTER LINKED TO DISAPPEARANCE OF 43 STUDENTS ARRESTED

The Mexican authorities have arrested a gang leader linked to the disappearance of 43 students last year in the town of Iguala in Guerrero state.

The government claims Gildardo Lopez Astudillo is one of the leaders of the infamous Guerreros Unidos drug cartel.

It says he gave the orders to abduct and kill the students in Iguala and the Mexican attorney-general’s office says its investigations show the Guerreros Unidos gang were handed the students by corrupt police.

Captured: The government says Gildardo Lopez Astudillo (pictured), known as 'El Gil', is a leader of the Guerreros Unidos drug cartel

Captured: The government says Gildardo Lopez Astudillo (pictured), known as ‘El Gil’, is a leader of the Guerreros Unidos drug cartel

Alleged mastermind behind massacre of student teachers arrested
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The office has said the Guerreros Unidos murdered the students because they thought they were members of a rival gang.

They then disposed of the bodies by burning them at a rubbish dump outside the city.

Official accounts contrast with a comprehensive report put together by an international group of experts.

The report claims the Mexican police’s investigation was deeply flawed and evidence had disappeared.

Disappearances do not count as deaths in official statistics, even though the corpses of many women show up in remote or wooded areas eventually.

Garfias said an even darker reality lurks behind these horrifying statistics.

She said: ‘Women are terrified of the authorities. We had one rape victim who reported the crime to the police but ended up being disappeared because she had sought justice.

‘We think that only about 40 per cent of rape victims even report the crime for fear of retribution.’

Guerrero state daily newspaper, Vértice, regularly publishes graphic photographs of the previous day’s murders on its back page.

‘We’ve been amazed not only by the increase in female victims, but also the terrible ways they are murdered,’ said the paper’s ‘Red News’ editor Jorge Pacheco.

Families of missing students continue to find mass graves
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Out in the open: 'The murderers aren't even trying to hide their crimes anymore,' said Maria Luisa Garfias, the last remaining founder of Women Allied for Justice

Out in the open: ‘The murderers aren’t even trying to hide their crimes anymore,’ said Maria Luisa Garfias, the last remaining founder of Women Allied for Justice

Horrifying: A skull, bones and a girl's dress (pictured in November 2014) were found in a clandestine grave, near the city of Iguala, where 43 students were kidnapped 

Horrifying: A skull, bones and a girl’s dress (pictured in November 2014) were found in a clandestine grave, near the city of Iguala, where 43 students were kidnapped

Losing hope: Discarded clothes lie near a mass grave on a ranch which was being searched by family members of missing people near Iguala (pictured in November 2014)

Losing hope: Discarded clothes lie near a mass grave on a ranch which was being searched by family members of missing people near Iguala (pictured in November 2014)

Search: Mexican police officers (pictured in August 2013) look for evidence in Tlalmanalco,  near Mexico City,  where at least 7 bodies were discovered in a mass grave

Search: Mexican police officers (pictured in August 2013) look for evidence in Tlalmanalco,  near Mexico City, where at least 7 bodies were discovered in a mass grave

‘Thrown from bridges, hung beside busy motorways, horrifically mutilated. More and more of these photos arrive every day. Things are going from bad to worse.’

Many experts and human rights groups fear that Mexico’s femicide problem is spiraling out of control.

Isarve Cano Vargas, 19, from the city of Tehuacan, is just one of around 4,000 women and girls who are kidnapped and murdered every year.

The daughter of a former politician was found dead in May, around a month after she went missing, even though her family paid her captors’ demanded ransom of around £83,000.

In January, the decaying body of aspiring actress Carmen Yarira Noriega Esparza, 27, was found inside a water tank in the Mexico City apartment block where she lived.

Psychology graduate Esparza vanished in February 2014, and friends and family feared she had been kidnapped by human traffickers and sold as a sex slave.

Maria Santos Gorrostieta, the mayor of Tiquicheo, was driving her young daughter to school when she was ambushed by a group of armed men.

The body of Gorrostieta, who had already survived two assassination attempts, was found stabbed, burned, battered and bound by a roadside in San Juan Tararameo, Cuitzeo Township.

And high school student Lupita Perez Montes, 17, who was last seen on January 31, is among 18 young women who have disappeared from the northern city of Ciudad Juarez in just over a year.

Guerrero state recently launched an online database for the state’s disappearance victims, but locals complain only the rare cases that are formally investigated by the authorities actually appear on it.

Gone: Isarve Cano Vargas (left), 19, was murdered in May this year, while female mayor Maria Santos Gorrostieta (right) was kidnapped while driving her daughter to school

Gone: Isarve Cano Vargas (left), 19, was murdered in May this year, while female mayor Maria Santos Gorrostieta (right) was kidnapped while driving her daughter to school

Gruesome: The body of Gorrostieta was found stabbed, burned, battered and bound by a roadside in San Juan Tararameo, Cuitzeo Township

Gruesome: The body of Gorrostieta was found stabbed, burned, battered and bound by a roadside in San Juan Tararameo, Cuitzeo Township

Deceased: Vargas (pictured) was found dead around a month after she went missing, even though her family paid her captors' demanded ransom of around £83,000

Deceased: Vargas (pictured) was found dead around a month after she went missing, even though her family paid her captors’ demanded ransom of around £83,000

Horrible discovery: The decaying body of an aspiring actress, Carmen Yarira Noriega Esparza, was found inside a water tank one year after she disappeared

Horrible discovery: The decaying body of an aspiring actress, Carmen Yarira Noriega Esparza, was found inside a water tank one year after she disappeared

Tormented: Rosa Segura Giral (left) holds up a photo of her daughter, Berenice, who went missing in Iguala and licia Modesta Mendoza Aviles holds up a photo of her missing daughter, Yolanda, who disappeared in the same town

Tormented: Rosa Segura Giral (left) holds up a photo of her daughter, Berenice, who went missing in Iguala and licia Modesta Mendoza Aviles holds up a photo of her missing daughter, Yolanda, who disappeared in the same town

Tormented: Rosa Segura Giral (left) holds up a photo of her daughter, Berenice, who went missing in Iguala and licia Modesta Mendoza Aviles holds up a photo of her missing daughter, Yolanda, who disappeared in the same town

Garfias said: ‘Our women’s defence organisation has taken over 900 cases of murder, disappearance and rape to the State Attorney’s office in the past twelve months.

‘Yet only 9% of all of those complaints have been investigated. Why aren’t the other 91% visible?’

When approached by MailOnline in person and subsequently via telephone, the Guerrero State Attorney’s office declined to comment.

At a meeting of Guerrero’s Committee for the Murdered and Disappeared, MailOnline heard the testimonies of many families left in uncertainty by the disappearance of loved ones.

Primary school teacher Noé Velasquez had taken out a loan of £12,000 – over three times his annual salary – to pay for his daughter’s ransom earlier this year.

His daughter, 18 year-old Jimena Vasquez, disappeared in March after meeting a man she had met online for coffee.

Although he gave the full ransom of 300,000 pesos to her kidnappers, his daughter never returned. Jimena Velasquez remains on Guerrero state’s disappeared list.

‘I’ve got enormous debt’, he told MailOnline, ‘but I’d pay ten times that if I could just have my daughter home and safe.’

Maria Velez, 15, disappeared in 2010 from Chilpancingo after getting into an unidentified black car outside her school.

Victim: One of the girls on Guerrero state's online database for the state's disappearance victims is Jimena Artemisa Velazquez Figueroa, 18

Victim: One of the girls on Guerrero state’s online database for the state’s disappearance victims is Jimena Artemisa Velazquez Figueroa, 18

Innocence lost: Shockingly, a five-year-old girl called Angelin Juliet Flores Ramos also appears on the list 

Innocence lost: Shockingly, a five-year-old girl called Angelin Juliet Flores Ramos also appears on the list

Vanished: Maria Guadalupe Velez Juarez, 15, is also on the database which is criticised by locals who say only the rare cases that are formally investigated by the authorities actually appear on it

Vanished: Maria Guadalupe Velez Juarez, 15, is also on the database which is criticised by locals who say only the rare cases that are formally investigated by the authorities actually appear on it

More than 600 women in Guerrero are thought to have disappeared so far this year, including 13-year-old Heidi Leticia Rivera Nunez

More than 600 women in Guerrero are thought to have disappeared so far this year, including 13-year-old Heidi Leticia Rivera Nunez

Broken man: Primary school teacher Noé Velasquez (pictured) took out a loan of £12,000  to pay for his daughter's ransom earlier this year

Broken man: Primary school teacher Noé Velasquez (pictured) took out a loan of £12,000 to pay for his daughter’s ransom earlier this year

It is the second time that her mother, Lilia Juarez, had lived through a forced disappearance. Her partner Jesus Moreno disappeared in 2008 in similar circumstances.

‘My loved ones have been taken from me’, she said, ‘and I can’t know if they’re alive or dead. I’m living through hell.’

Maria Rodriguez and Atanacio Molina’s eldest son Josué Molina disappeared last year when three armed men kidnapped him from outside his school.

He had been overheard plotting revenge over the kidnap of his cousin just a week before. He has not been seen or heard from since.

It was the first time Maria and Atanacio had spoken to the media about their missing son.

‘It’s not a good idea to tell the newspapers about a kidnapped relative, as the criminals invariably take the unwanted publicity out on their victim’, said Maria with tears in her eyes. ‘But it’s been over a year and we’ve heard nothing.’

Nearly every member of the committee has had to conduct their own investigations into the disappearances of their loved ones, and most have received death threats as a result.

‘They (the narcos) called and told me that if I kept investigating then my daughter would become an orphan’, said Haydee Cortes, whose husband disappeared at the hands of armed men in 2007.

‘They’ve threatened me continuously but I’m not scared’, said Maria Rodriguez. ‘If only I could know he was dead for certain then I could leave this terrible uncertainty behind and grieve for my son’.

As many as 38 per cent of all forced disappearance cases in Mexico occur in Guerrero. 20 per cent of these disappeared victims are women, nearly double of that in the second-worst affected state, where females make up just 12 per cent of the disappeared.

‘It’s an insipid form a terrorism,’ said Federico Mastrogiovanni, author of Neither Alive, Nor Dead, an investigation into the recent surge in nationwide forced disappearance in Mexico.

‘When the families aren’t sure whether a kidnapped family member is still alive they are less likely to go to the police for fear that by denouncing the crime they will anger the criminals, who may then take it out on their loved one.’

Guerrero is one of Mexico’s most impoverished states, and gender inequality is a serious issue. Women earn on average just 38 per cent of what their male counterparts do, and state-wide literacy among adult females is just 77 per cent.

‘Strong women are turned into social pariahs here,’ says Maria Luisa Garfias, ‘The patriarchal society here is enforced by the narco culture that has developed in recent years.’

Torturous: Lilia Juarez's (left) daughter Maria Velez, 15, disappeared in 2010 from Chilpancingo after getting into an unidentified black car outside her school

Torturous: Lilia Juarez’s (left) daughter Maria Velez, 15, disappeared in 2010 from Chilpancingo after getting into an unidentified black car outside her school

Heartbroken: Maria Rodriguez (right) and Atanacio Molina's (left) eldest son Josué Molina disappeared last year when three armed men kidnapped him

Heartbroken: Maria Rodriguez (right) and Atanacio Molina’s (left) eldest son Josué Molina disappeared last year when three armed men kidnapped him

Retaliation: Their son Josue had been overheard plotting revenge over the kidnap of his cousin just a week before

Retaliation: Their son Josue had been overheard plotting revenge over the kidnap of his cousin just a week before

Solidarity: At a meeting of Guerrero's Committee for the Murdered and Disappeared (pictured), MailOnline heard the testimonies of many families left in uncertainty by the disappearance of loved ones

Solidarity: At a meeting of Guerrero’s Committee for the Murdered and Disappeared (pictured), MailOnline heard the testimonies of many families left in uncertainty by the disappearance of loved ones

War: 'Here we've got the Rojos, the Pelones, the Templars, New Generation, the Zetas, the Gulf Cartel and Sinaloa all fighting over control of narcotics production', said Ahilin's uncle Pedro Nava (pictured)

War: ‘Here we’ve got the Rojos, the Pelones, the Templars, New Generation, the Zetas, the Gulf Cartel and Sinaloa all fighting over control of narcotics production’, said Ahilin’s uncle Pedro Nava (pictured)

Guerrero is an important state for the drug cartel industry. The state’s fertile land, poverty, lack of roads, semi-tropical climate and inaccessible terrain make it perfect for the clandestine cultivation of marijuana and opium poppies – used to manufacture heroin.

It’s considered the most fought-over state by narcotraffickers in Mexico.

‘Here we’ve got the Rojos, the Pelones, the Templars, New Generation, the Zetas, the Gulf Cartel and Sinaloa all fighting over control of narcotics production’, said Ahilin’s uncle Pedro Nava, who campaigns for the region’s local population.

‘We have shootouts in the hills around us every night’, says Pablo Nava, whose daughter Aidé was brutally murdered earlier this year. ‘When things don’t go one side’s way they take it out on the local women.’

Around 41 hectares of opium poppy fields surround the town where Pablo’s granddaughters have been left parentless as a result of the violence.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3239700/Thrown-bridges-horrifically-mutilated-raped-simply-disappeared-Inside-Mexican-state-900-women-vanished-murdered-1-200-raped-single-year.html#ixzz4B05lPyZp
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

Marine Imprisoned In Cartel Controlled Mexican Town Ignored by Obama

Image result for Jon Hammar marine mexico

Marine Imprisoned In Cartel Controlled Mexican Town Ignored by Obama

By Richard Boyden

Update:  Jon Hammar was released the Friday before Christmas 2012. This article was in part responsible for Jon being released and which was read by the Department of Defense and the State Department.  Also this article was HACKED/DELETED by a hater of all things American, Scott Prentice who owns Black Hills Publishing. Prentice is also a race hater of American Indians who he calls “savages”. His Freemason mindset is in harmony with the likes of the KKK. Click HERE to read about who Prentice is.  

Image result for Jon Hammar marine mexico

United States Marine Jon Hammar served in Iraq and Afghanistan. The internalized and festering underneath his outer shell combat related trauma that followed him home led to his decision to take a vacation to Costa Rica. Some combat Marines dealing with PTSD like Hammar call a dream vacation like this a “mental health break”. Hammar had conferred with his parents and they agreed together that a trip to Costa Rica offered hope that the Hammar’s nightmares containing real life reality show reruns of the death of his Marine Corp brother would be at least partially deleted and replaced with new experiences and memories that would help relieve the heart wrenching pain he was daily dealing with. They together believed that by immersing his wounded heart and spirit in a new environment, he would finally begin to heal. Of course…this is something President Barack Hussein Obama is not able to comprehend because he has never been shot at or seen “one of his own” take a bullet in the head.

Marine Jon Hammar did not enter into a friend of America country on his way to Costa Rica. Instead on August 23, 2012, he and a fellow Marine and friend entered into a Mexico that acted like the Muslim Brotherhood in their treatment of him. Obama and the State Department knew full well that Hammar was kidnapped…no…taken prisoner, by a police force that is on the payroll of the cartels who own and operate a hell hole prison called CEDES where Hammar was placed and is located in Matamoros Mexico. Matamoros is documented to be a drug cartel infested drug trafficking and logistical center right across the border from Brownsville Texas. It is also the traditional home and stronghold of the CDG (the Gulf Cartel). The CDG and Los Zetas are locked in a bloody war for control of the lucrative “Plazas” (drug trafficking routes) into the state of Texas.

One notorious public display of Matamoros being the quaint Mexican border town that it is, took place in July 2010 when 12 Mexicans, 1 woman and 11 men, were tortured, shot dead, and laid out on a main town road like so many hunting trophies by one of the drug cartels. One American was singled out for the most brutal torturing and murdering experience that only Satan could inspire.

These are the kind of Mexican citizens who operate freely in Matamoros and are in collusion with the police force that arrested Hammar. It should be pointed out that Hammar was not trying to enter Mexico illegally, transport drugs in to or from, or sneak illegal immigrants back into the US. Neither was Hammar working as an “operative” for Obama’s and Eric Holders Justice Department’s “Fast and Furious” program and got caught attempting to hand out assault weapons to the cartels for big bucks. If that were the case, Hammar would of had a cartel escort to Costa Rica.

Instead, Hammar was arrested, beaten, tortured, jailed, and chained to a steel bed on trumped up charges of having an “illegal weapon” according to the cartel controlled police in Matamoros. How illegal? Say 1″ length of a antiquated shotgun barrel which length was deemed legal by U.S customs authorities to take into Mexico before Hammar entered into Mexico.

The questions needing to be asked in light of what has happened to Marine Jon Hammar four months ago, why does the Obama supporting left wing liberal media continually feature Obama and his wife thanking members of the military for their service, offering condolences to those who have lost their lives such as members ofSeal Team 6 with tokenistic self serving rhetoric while at the same time, they intentionally ignore the plight of this Marine who has served his country? And why has Hammar been officially classified as being of no importance for four months by Obama and the Government of the United States yet on Dec. 9th, Obama gave the green light for Seal Team 6 to rescue a civilian doctor named Dr. Dilip Joseph who was kidnapped and held captive for one week by either smugglers or the Taliban in a remote village in Afghanistan?

Interestingly in light of Hammar’s situation being ignored by the Obama and his administration, there is another American soldier named Bowe Robert Bergdahl who has also been forgotten by Obama. Bergdahl was captured by the Taliban-aligned Afghanistan Haqqani network in June 2009. When was the last time you read or heard about him in the media? Is there a political pattern here based upon how Obama really feels about the our men and women in the military?

Behind closed doors, the government of Mexico must think what is happening to Marine Jon Hammar is funny…one of those Americans that are the brunt of the latest jokes on Mexico’s version of “Saturday Night Live”. No love lost on their part for this Marine. The government of Mexico is sternly embracing and using trivial legal arguments to keep Hammar incarcerated and tortured. Hammar’s family has continually been exposed to blackmail and extortion demands. Not a problem for the government of Mexico.

Other reasons for dragging this injustice on might very well be Mexico’s goal to publicly shame the United States which if the case, has to be fueled by Mexico’s subliminal hate of America using Hammar as a public display of such hate. The American public, the American military, and in particular, members of the United States Marine Corp should begin to wonder if President Obama’s silence concerning Hammar is indicative of the same.

If this is not the case, then as Commander In Chief, President Obama needs to back up his patriotic love America and the military speeches by considering a “Seal Team 6″ rescue mission of Hammar because right now, the government of Mexico and the cartels who control the police in Matamoros Mexico who arrested Hammar for no good reason, appear to have agreed together not to release him. In fact, they are acting just like the enemies in Iraq and Afghanistan that United States Marine Jon Hammar fought against.

A real friend of America would admit to their wrongs and make things right. Not to do so is the deliberate and intentional act of an enemy and therefore they should be dealt with as such for the sake of this Marine. President Obama needs to decide who’s side he is on.

Richard Boyden… Marine…Free Lance Journalist

richard_boyden2000@yahoo.com

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